Proceedings of Southeastern Fish and Wildlife Conference

Prior to 2013, SEAFWA published the Proceedings of annual conferences. In 2014, SEAFWA began publishing the peer-reviewed Journal of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

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Article Year

Description of Bowfishing Tournaments in the Trinity River, Texas, with Emphasis on Harvest of Alligator Gar

Bowfishing may represent a substantial portion of the recreational harvest of alligator gar, but little is known about the relative efficiency of the angling method. To better understand angler effort and harvest rates, we collected data from three Trinity River bowfishing tournaments each year during 2009, 2010, and 2011 (n = 9). Harvest ranged from 2 to 30 alligator gar per tournament with 641 anglers harvesting a total of 134 fish for all years.

Daniel L. Bennett, C. Craig Bonds

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 1-5

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2012

A Population Assessment and Minimum Length Limit Evaluation for White Bass in the Arkansas River, Arkansas

White bass (Morone chrysops) are a popular sport fish throughout most of their zoogeographic distribution. We conducted a population assessment of white bass in Pool 4 of the Arkansas River. Using population metrics calculated from the assessment, responses of the white bass fishery to a 254-mm or 305-mm minimum length limit (MLL) were simulated using the Fishery Analysis and Modeling Simulator (FAMS) model. White bass ages ranged from 1-7, but 88% of white bass were less than age 5.

Brandon W. Baker, Steve E. Lochmann

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 6-11

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2012

Effects of Exposure to Calcium-deficient Water on Fertilization and Hatching of Channel Catfish x Blue Catfish F1 Hybrids

Most hybrid catfish are produced by fertilizing eggs from hormone-induced, strippable channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) females with sperm from blue catfish (I. furcatus). Water to most hatcheries is supplied from 300 to 400-m deep aquifer, yielding geothermal water of 25-30 C with low level of calcium hardness and hence supplemented with an external source of calcium. Many catfish hatchery water sources have low calcium concentrations and are supplemented with an external source of calcium.

Nagaraj G. Chatakondi

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 12-15

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2012

Pellet-reared Largemouth Bass Competitive Ability at Various Levels of Exposure to Live Forage

We investigated the effects of exposing pellet-reared, advanced-fingerling largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) to live forage on the ability of bass to capture live forage (competitive ability). Wild and pellet-reared largemouth bass were paired in competitive trials in 75-L aquaria and offered live fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Prior to competitive trials, pellet-reared largemouth bass were placed into trial groups and fed fathead minnows daily for 0, 2, 4, 8, and 16 days among groups.

Kyle T. Rachels, Gordon R. Taylor, Brandon M. Baumhoer, Sagar Shrestha, Steve E. Lochmann

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 16-19

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2012

Evaluation of Carlin Dangler Tags in Hatchery-reared Channel Catfish

Long-term tagging studies require a tag that has high retention and does not cause significant mortality. Retention and induced mortality were determined for advanced fingerling channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) tagged with Carlin dangler tags. We stocked three replicate 0.10-ha ponds with 100 tagged and 150 untagged channel catfish. Mean length ± SD of fish stocked was 232 ± 20 mm (range: 179-282 mm). Mean annual tag loss was 10% and ranged from 4% to 19% among ponds. Annual survival was 9% lower for tagged (mean = 52%) than unmarked control fish (mean = 61%).

Jeffrey W. Quinn, Carl A. Perrin, J. J. Gladden, Nilima Renukdas, Carole Engle

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 20-

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2012

Trends in Fishery Agency Assessments of Black Bass Tournaments in the Southeastern United States

Studies conducted during the last 30 years have identified benefits and adverse impacts and have documented increased frequency of fishing tournaments. This study used information provided by state fisheries management agency administrators to measure the frequency of black bass (Micropterus spp.) tournaments in southeastern states and assessed how reported changes in tournament frequency have impacted fisheries management.

M. Todd Driscoll, Kevin M. Hunt, Harold L. Schramm, Jr.

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 25-32

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2012

Blue Catfish Angler Survey in North-central Texas: Implications for Management

Management of blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) fisheries has recently increased in priority for many fisheries management agencies, but little is known about managing these fisheries. Also, while large-scale surveys (i.e., national and statewide) have provided managers with baseline sociological information, localized motivations and opinions of blue catfish anglers remain unknown in most areas. A mail-out survey was conducted to quantify motivations and opinions of blue catfish anglers in an eight-county area in north-central Texas to better manage local blue catfish fisheries.

Ben C. Neely, Spencer C. Dumont

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 33-36

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2012

Investigation of Potential Hybridization Among Black Bass Species in Alan Henry Reservoir, Texas

Reports of extensive hybridization among black bass species throughout North America as well as anecdotal information from anglers led to an investigation of the possibility of hybridization between Alabama bass (M. henshalli) and both subspecies of largemouth bass (M. salmoides salmoides and M. s. floridanus) in Alan Henry Reservoir, Texas. Fish were collected and identified by field staff and then by using genetic markers.

Charles Munger, Dijar J. Lutz-Carrillo

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 37-41

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2012

Social and Cultural Aspects of Paddlefish Anglers at Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri

An exploratory study was conducted on paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) anglers at Lake of the Ozarks near Warsaw, Missouri, to learn about their social and cultural aspects, such as activity involvement and place dependence in relation to travel distance. Although Lake of the Ozarks is a premier fishery in the state of Missouri, little is known about these participants. An on-site survey was completed and returned by 423 out of 595 anglers (71% response rate).

Mark Morgan, Robert Pierce, II, Sterling Hayden

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 42-48

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2012

Spotted Bass Population Characteristics and Relationships with Macrohabitat Variables in the Arkansas River, Arkansas

Despite its importance to anglers, the Arkansas River spotted bass (Micropterus punctulatus) fishery has not been intensively studied or managed. Thus, spotted bass populations in the lower nine navigation pools of the Arkansas River were assessed during 2004-2005 using nighttime boatmounted electrofishing. Across years and pools, size structure measures were within acceptable ranges for black basses (mean PSDQ = 38, range 21-56; mean PSDP = 10, range 0-19).

Michael A. Eggleton, Benjamin G. Batten, Clint R. Peacock, Steve E. Lochmann

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 49-56

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2012

Feasibility of Trap and Transport of Adult River Herring to Restore Spawning Populations in A Southeastern U.S. Coastal Watershed

Adult alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (A. aestivalis) (collectively referred to as river herring) have rarely been trapped and transported during the spawning period to restore spawning runs in southern coastal U.S. watersheds, though this is a common practice in New England. We tested the feasibility of this practice in North Carolina to develop a protocol to assist in restocking and conservation efforts. River herring were collected using pound nets in the Scuppernong River at Columbia, North Carolina, from February-April 2007.

Roger A. Rulifson, Anthony S. Overton, Andrew Gross

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 57-63

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2012

Comparison of Two Objective Protocols used to Determine the Status of North Carolina Aquatic Species

A primary responsibility of wildlife resources agencies is to determine a species' conservation status. Two widely utilized protocols for status determination are those of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and NatureServe. This study compares the risk categorization for 58 species of aquatic wildlife extant in North Carolina. The IUCN and NatureServe protocols produced threat rankings that were correlated with each other but very different in terms of how they classified risk.

Todd Ewing

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 64-68

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2012

Seasonal Condition of Adult Striped Bass Relative to Thermal Habitat and Forage Availability

Adult striped bass (Morone saxitilis) are vulnerable to high summer water temperatures and low dissolved oxygen (DO) in southern reservoirs, potentially resulting in poor body condition and elevated mortality. In Lake Buchanan, Texas, mean relative weights for striped bass >500 mm ranged from 77 to 84 from 2002-2007 in spring surveys when relative weight should be maximized. Two hypotheses were tested that could explain the observed poor condition of Lake Buchanan adult striped bass in spring: (1) lack of available prey, or (2) lack of suitable habitat during the previous summer.

Nathan G. Smith

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 69-74

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2012

Subspecies Composition of Angled and Electrofished Largemouth Bass in Texas Reservoirs

Studies assessing whether there are differences in angling susceptibility between northern largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides salmoides (NLMB) and Florida largemouth bass M. s. floridanus, (FLMB) have typically been conducted at small study sites and have produced inconsistent results. Thus it is unclear how these results translate to natural populations, particularly those in large bodies of water.

Dijar J. Lutz-Carrillo, Spencer Dumont

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 75-81

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2012

Shifting Genetic Composition of Largemouth Bass Populations in Dendritic Arms of Two Large Arkansas Reservoirs Through Stocking of Florida Largemouth Bass

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has been annually stocking Florida largemouth bass (FLMB, Micropterus salmoides floridanus) at rates of 250 fish ha-1 into small dendritic sections of two large Arkansas reservoirs, Lake DeGray and Lake Ouachita, since 2006 and 2007, respectively, to alter local pre-existent northern largemouth bass (NLMB, Micropterus s. salmoides) populations. The management goal for these actions is to have 40% of the local largemouth bass (LMB) population possessing FLMB alleles within eight years of the initiation of the stocking program.

Karl A. Lamothe, Ryan M. Allen, Christopher Cato, Kelly Winningham, Colton Dennis, Ronald L. Johnson

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 82-87

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2012

Angler Opinions Regarding Catfish Management in Tennessee

Emphasis on catfish management has increased in Tennessee, and in 2003 the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency adopted new regulations protecting trophy-sized catfish by restricting recreational harvest of catfish >864 mm to one fish per day and eliminating all commercial harvest of catfish >864 mm. A statewide survey on licensed catfish anglers was conducted in fall 2000, 2005 and 2006 to determine if angler responses changed following implementation of these regulations.

David R. Stewart, George D. Scholten, Timothy N. Churchill, J. Mark Fly

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 88-93

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2012

Demographics, Attitudes, Preferences, and Satisfaction of Texas Freshwater Catfish Anglers

In 2010, we conducted a follow-up survey of anglers who responded to the 2009 Texas Statewide Angler Survey and indicated that they fished for catfish in the previous year or listed catfish as a preferred species. The follow-up survey assessed demographics, fishing methods, areas fished, species preferences, attitudes, and satisfaction of Texas catfish anglers. Only 26% of respondents considered catfish to be their primary species sought. We grouped anglers by their preferred species, but observed few demographic differences among these groups.

Kevin M. Hunt, Clifford P. Hutt, J. Warren Schlechte, David L. Buckmeier

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 94-101

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2012

Mourning Dove Survival from Band Recoveries in Northern Mississippi

During 2002-2003, we trapped and banded 1870 mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) in Hell Creek Wildlife Management Area located in northern Mississippi. Of these, we recovered 152 banded doves and recorded 845 live recaptures. We calculated apparent weekly survival using live recaptures model in Program MARK. Best model yielded adult survival estimates of >0.90 through week 13, then declined to 0.88 by week 15. Juvenile survival estimates followed a similar trend with >0.90 through week 13, then dropping to 0.85 by week 15.

Jeremy M. Bennett, Francisco J. Vilella

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 102-106

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2012

Does Supplemental Feeding of Deer Degrade Vegetation? A Literature Review

Artificially feeding deer is controversial, particularly in North America. Our objective was to determine if published literature supports the hypothesis that supplemental feeding of deer leads to overuse of palatable plants and vegetation degradation. We found 16 papers regarding the feeding of deer through a search of the literature since 1989.

Whitney J. Priesmeyer, Timothy E. Fulbright, Eric D. Grahmann, David D. Hewitt, Charles A. DeYoung, Don A. Draeger

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 107-113

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2012

Antler Breakage Patterns in White-tailed Deer

Antlers contribute greatly to the life history and ecology of most species in the deer family (Cervidae). Diet composition and quality, precipitation, age, antler size, dominance rank, and demographic parameters (e.g., adult sex ratio, density) of the population may explain variation in antler breakage rates between individuals and subpopulations. Our objectives were to examine the effects of some of these variables on probability of antler breakage and provide a general description of antler breakage patterns in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

Gabriel R. Karns, Stephen S. Ditchkoff

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 114-119

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2012

Impact of Hunting Pressure on Adult Male White-tailed Deer Behavior

Hunting pressure can lead to drastic changes in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) behavior, though previous studies have focused mainly on females and juvenile males. Adult male white-tailed deer have not been studied in the context of hunting pressure since the advent of GPS technology.

Christopher S. DePerno, Gabriel R. Karns, Mark C. Conner, Richard A. Lancia

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 120-125

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2012

Population Characteristics of a White-tailed Deer Herd in an Industrial Pine Forest of North-central Louisiana

White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are the most important game species in Louisiana and throughout the southeastern United States. Likewise, the forest products industry represents the most important agricultural commodity in Louisiana, and industrial landowners frequently lease their properties to sportsmen specifically for white-tailed deer hunting. We assessed survival, space use, and habitat selection of white-tailed deer on a 3885-ha industrial forest in Union Parish, Louisiana, 2009-2010. We radio-marked 47 (23M, 24F) mature deer and ear-tagged 13 (6M, 7F) fawns.

John Henry Harrelson, Michael E. Byrne, Michael J. Chamberlain, Scott Durham

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 126-132

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2012

Effects of Row Spacing and Debris Distribution on Deer Forage and Carrying Capacity in Newly Established Loblolly-pine Plantations in Louisiana

Intensively managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests are common in the southeastern United States and critical to providing fiber for global wood supply needs. There are concerns regarding possible effects of stand establishment treatments on plant communities, particularly availability and quality of browse for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We quantified response of non-pine vegetation productivity at either narrow (4.3 m) or wide (6.1 m) row spacing combined with either piled or scattered woody debris following clearcut harvest in Louisiana.

Joshua L. Grace, Michael J. Chamberlain, Darren A. Miller

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 133-139

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2012

Contrasts of Waterfowl Hunter Surveys: Open Web and Random Mail Surveys Produce Similar Policy Results

We conducted random mail and open web surveys of Louisiana waterfowl hunters following the 2011-2012 season, asking identical questions about waterfowl hunting effort, success, satisfaction, proposed regulatory actions, and demographics. We received 1,096 usable responses to our mail survey, and 1,286 usable responses to an on-line survey that was open for anyone to answer. Respondents to the web survey hunted much more, harvested more ducks, and were somewhat younger; but we noted similarities across survey methods in attitudes toward proposed regulatory actions.

Lucien P. Laborde, Jr., Frank C. Rohwer, Michael D. Kaller, Larry Reynolds

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 140-145

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2012

A Look at Pay Parity in State Patrol and Conservation Agencies

This research puts pay and contextual data gleaned from state conservation and state patrol agencies in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Missouri, and West Virginia into the context of an anonymous survey of conservation rangers from across the country. Facts about pay, including the number of rangers, starting pay, and pay for experienced rangers is viewed through the lens of responses from 372 rangers in 17 states across the United States.

Mary Eleanor Wickersham

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 146-152

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2012

Implementing an Integrated Forest Management System for Long-term Habitat Planning and Development on Georgia's Wildlife Management Areas

The Game Management (GM) Section of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Wildlife Resources Division (WRD) implemented several processes in the late 1990s geared toward systematic long-term forest management of state-owned Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs). These included development of 50-year management plans for individual WMAs, expansion of the Forest Management Unit (FMU), and development of a cooperative timber harvest proposal protocol.

Matthew D. Payne, Alex B. Coley, John W. Bowers

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 153-

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2012

Effectiveness of Continuous-catch Doors for Trapping Wild Pigs

Lethal removal by trapping is the most cost- and time-effective means for managing wild pigs (Sus scrofa); however, there is much debate regarding the effectiveness of continuous-catch doors (trap doors that allow the entry of additional pigs into the trap after the door initially closes). Our objective was to determine entry rates by wild pigs of root, saloon, and trainer continuous-catch doors. We constructed 26 corral traps on four study areas in east-central and southwest Alabama during the summer 2011.

Trenton N. Smith, Mark D. Smith, Dana K. Johnson

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 154-

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2012

Effects of Growing-season Prescribed Fire on Eastern Wild Turkey Nest Survival, Nest Success, and Poult Survival in Southwestern Georgia

We investigated effects of growing-season prescribed fire on daily nest survival, nest success, and poult survival of eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) on two similar research sites in southwestern Georgia: the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center and Silver Lake Wildlife Management Area. We collected daily locations for radio-tagged females throughout the 2011-2012 nesting seasons. Females with nests or poults near or within an active growing-season fire were located hourly.

Mary M. Williams, Christina M. Perez, James A. Ruttinger, Derek S. Colbert Andrew R. Little, Michael J. Chamberlain, L. Mike Conner, Robert J. Warren

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 155-

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2012

Characteristics of Day Roosts Used by Eastern Small-footed Bats in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

The eastern small-footed bat (Myotis leibii) is a rarely encountered species that has experienced declines in its populations and is currently being petitioned for federal listing. Throughout most of its range, M. leibii roost in rock fields and talus slopes with low canopy cover and high solar exposure. However, we know little about roost characteristics in the southern portion of its range. Therefore, in summers 2011 and 2012, we studied a male-dominated, bridge-roosting population of M. leibii in the Southern Appalachian Mountains to document the characteristics of their roosts.

Tara J. Thomson, Joy M. O'Keefe

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 156-

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2012

The South Carolina Red-cockaded Woodpecker Safe Harbor Program: Partnering with Private Landowners in Endangered Species Conservation

The red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) (RCW), a species dependent upon mature, fire-maintained pine forests in the Southeastern United States, was listed as endangered in 1970 due to habitat destruction and degradation. With roughly a quarter of RCWs occupying private lands, many landowners were reluctant to maintain habitat attractive to RCWs for fear of Endangered Species Act (ESA) land-use restrictions associated with harboring the birds.

M. Paige Koon

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 157-

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2012

The Hydrogeomorphic Rapid Assessment Procedure and Greentree Reservoir Assessment Procedure for the Delta Region of Arkansas

The Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) Approach is a method for developing functional indices for specific wetland subclasses based on reference data and the protocols used to apply these indices to the assessment of wetland functions at a site-specific scale. It has been argued that the data collection and analysis process for HGM assessments are overly burdensome for routine application.

Jennifer Elise Sheehan, Elizabeth Olsen Murray

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 158-

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2012

Achieving Conservation through Citizen Science

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Volunteer Stewardship Program (VSP) was established to implement citizen science projects that focus on priority habitats and species, as well as fill data gaps for species of greatest conservation need identified in the Florida State Wildlife Action Plan. The program builds partnerships with conservation agencies and organizations to develop a statewide network of trained volunteers.

Sharon Tatem, Anne Glick, Jerrie Lindsey

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 159-159

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2012

Fox Squirrel Distribution and Habitat Selection in Florida

The eastern fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) occurs across most of eastern North America, with 10 recognized subspecies in the United States. Six of these occur in the southeastern coastal plain and Piedmont regions and are associated with the fire dependent, pine (Pinus sp.) forests that once dominated the landscape. In Florida, over 90% of the longleaf pine (P. palustris) forests have been lost, and the resulting range contraction and population decline in fox squirrels has led to the protection of two subspecies: the Sherman's fox squirrel (S. n.

Courtney A. Tye, R. A. McCleery, R. J. Fletcher, R. Butryn

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 160-

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2012

Bioenergy and Biodiversity

Concerns about energy availability, cost, and climate change have increased attention to policy that encourages advances in biomass production and capacity to process biomass. Bioenergy policy and production can result in positive steps toward meeting U.S. energy needs but sustainability depends on consideration of impact on the Nation's natural resources to ensure all societal needs are met.

Bill McGuire

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 161-

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2012

Effects of Bioenergy Production on Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat: An Overview of the Forthcoming TWS Technical Review and Implications for Forestry in the Southeast

The production of bioenergy “feedstocks” (i.e., plant-based material used for transportation fuels, heat, and power) has been expanding rapidly in recent years. Unfortunately, there are considerable gaps in our knowledge base about implications of this industry expansion for wildlife. This information deficit is likely to grow as the industry expands and rapidly evolves in new directions in the coming years.

Sam Riffell, Susan P. Rupp, Jake Verschuyl, T. Bently Wigley, Laura Bies, Aviva Glaser, Charles Kowaleski, Timothy McCoy, Terra Rentz, Julie Sibbing

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 162-

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2012

Addressing the Invasive Potential of Bioenergy Feedstocks in the Southeast United States

Every year, invasive species cost the United States billions of dollars and affect countless acres of native ecosystems. The southeast in particular has been dramatically affected by invasions of such species as kudzu. The recent rapid expansion of biofuels and bioenergy production, combined with the diversification of potential bioenergy crops, has generated considerable interest in the use of non-native and genetically modified biomass feedstocks that have the potential to become ecologically-damaging invasives.

Aviva Glaser

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 163-

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2012

A Comparison Between Anglers Using Live Bait and Artificial Lures for Largemouth Bass in Three Mississippi Lakes

Largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) are one of the most sought after species at the 19 state fishing lakes operated in Mississippi. Bass anglers fishing these lakes typically use artificial lures; however, anglers using live bait for catching largemouth bass have been reported on a limited number of lakes. These lakes were stocked during relatively the same time period and each lake is known for producing trophy size largemouth bass. Attitudes toward live bait use vary and some believe the practice can impact the fishery.

Jerry L Brown, Jr.

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 164-

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2012

The Effects of Age-0 Gizzard Shad Abundance on Piscivore Abundance and Condition in Southern Reservoirs

The majority of piscivores found in southern U.S. reservoirs consume primarily age-0 (≤100mm) gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum). However, gizzard shad grow rapidly, so even systems with high gizzard shad biomass could be food-limited if most gizzard shad are too large to be eaten. Previous studies comparing gizzard shad abundance and piscivore prey demand have only considered one or a few piscivores, but many southern reservoirs have seven or more piscivores in the community. This suggests prey limitation may be more common than these studies suggest.

Nathaniel J. Copeland, Daniel E. Shoup

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 165-

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2012

Texas Water Planning

The human population of Texas is projected to nearly double in the next 50 years. The Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill 1 in 1997 initiating a regional water planning process for the state. Additional requirements were added as a result of the passage of Senate Bill 2 during the 77th Texas Legislature in 2001. Senate Bill 3 was passed in 2007 and established a stakeholder driven, science-based process for setting environmental flow standards.

Cindy Loeffler

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 166-

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2012

Southeastern Cave Bats: Reservoirs for Future Populations

Since 2006, White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) has devastated bat populations across eastern North America. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimates the loss at more than 5.5 million bats. WNS and/or the fungal causative agent (Geomyces destructans) has now been documented in 21 states in the United States including Alabama, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and West Virginia, and 4 Canadian provinces. Several southern states have confirmed the presence of G. destructans, without manifestation of WNS or the significant mortality observed in northeastern sites.

Katie Gillies

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 167-

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2012

Herpetofauna Response to Fire and Imazapyr in Intensively- managed Mid-rotation Pine Stands in Mississippi

Forest managers are increasingly expected to incorporate conservation of biodiversity in forest management plans, but a paucity of information exists regarding herpetofauna responses to mid-rotation release practices of dormant-season prescribed fire and herbicide in intensively-managed pine (Pinus spp.) stands. However, these management tools have demonstrated capabilities of improving conservation value in southeastern pine forests.

Raymond B. Iglay, Bruce D. Leopold, Darren A. Miller

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 168-

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2012

Multi-year Population Estimates of an Expanding Black Bear Population in the Interior Highlands, Arkansas

American black bear (Ursus americanus) populations in the Interior Highlands, Arkansas, have expanded since reintroduction in the late 1950s and early 1960s requiring management of harvests and nuisance complaints. Success of bear conservation efforts and the effects of nuisance harvests cannot be evaluated without reliable information on population abundance, trends, and distribution.

Thea Kristensen, Kaitlyn Faries, Lori Eggert, Myron Means, Kimberly G. Smith, Don White, Jr.

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 169-

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2012

Snag Density after Different Timber Harvests in Pine-hardwood Forests

Standing dead trees (snags) are an important component of forest ecosystems, providing foraging and roosting substrate for a variety of wildlife species. We examined the effects of four timber harvest treatments on residual snag density and compared these to densities found in unmanaged natural forests (controls) during the second, fourth, and sixth year after timber harvest in mixed pine-hardwood forests of Arkansas. Timber harvest methods were: clearcut with residual tree retention and snag creation, shelterwood, single-tree selection, and group selection.

Roger W. Perry, Ronald E. Thill

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 170-

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2012

Using Nestling Feathers to Assess Spatial and Temporal Concentrations of Mercury in Bald Eagles at Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have been utilized as a biosentinel of aquatic ecosystem health in the Great Lakes Region since the early 1960s. Bald eagle populations have been monitored at Voyageurs National Park (VNP), Minnesota, since 1973. For the past 20 years, researchers have collected feathers from nestling bald eagles to assess their dietary exposure to mercury (Hg) on Rainy, Kabetogama, and Namakan lakes in VNP. Current geometric mean concentrations have declined by 77.4% since 1989 at VNP.

H. T. Pittman, W. W. Bowerman, L. H. Grim, T. G. Grubb, W. C. Bridges

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 171-

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2012

Using Nestling Feathers to Assess Spatial and Temporal Concentrations of Organochlorine Pesticides in Bald Eagles at Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) are a sentinel species used to monitor concentrations of environmental contaminants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCs) in North America. Bald eagles were very slow to recover after the ban of PCBs and OCs because of their environmental persistence. The bald eagle population at Voyageurs National Park (VNP) provides an opportunity to assess temporal and spatial trends of persistent environmental contaminants. Nestling bald eagle plasma samples were analyzed for PCBs and OCs for the past 14 years.

H. T. Pittman, W. W. Bowerman, L. H. Grim, T. G. Grubb, W. C. Bridges

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 172-

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2012

Breeding Bird Community Responses to Growing Versus Dormant Season Prescribed Fire

Prescribed fires are frequently used to restore and maintain pine savanna in the southeastern United States. Although several declining bird species occur within these pine savannas, few studies have directly compared the effects of growing versus dormant season prescribed fires on breeding birds. Therefore, we compared the effects of growing- versus dormant-season prescribed fires on breeding bird communities in mature pine (Pinus spp.) stands within the Fort Benning Military Reservation in west-central Georgia.

Vanessa R. Lane, Thomas Gregory King, Mark Howell, Brian R. Chapman, Karl V. Miller

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 1-7

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2011

Seasonal Space Use and Habitat Selection of Female Wild Turkeys in a Louisiana Bottomland Forest

Space use and habitat selection of wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) has been well studied in various upland landscapes, but information within bottomland hardwood systems is lacking. Turkeys in bottomland systems face unique situations (e.g., flooding) and turkey behavior observed in upland systems may not directly apply to bottomland systems.

Frederick G. Kimmel, Michael E. Byrne, Michael J. Chamberlain

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 8-14

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2011

Improvement of a Catch-per-unit-effort Estimator for White-tailed Deer Populations

Catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) is a useful index of population density that is often applied to harvested populations. Because CPUE is an economical index and data collection is simple, we wanted to enhance the user-friendliness and accessibility of a tool for tracking deer population abundance by recoding an existing FORTRAN estimator to JMP scripting language (JSL).

Gabriel R. Karns, Richard A. Lancia, John W. Bishir, Christopher S. DePerno, Mark. C. Conner, Clay Barker

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 15-20

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2011

Predicting North Carolina Landowner Participation and Interest in Wildlife Related Fee Access

Wildlife-related fee access can provide supplemental income to private landowners, potentially protecting wildlife habitat by keeping land undeveloped. We surveyed 1,368 private landowners in North Carolina to determine the factors influencing whether they leased land to hunters or were interested in offering leases for other types of wildlife related recreation. Five percent of landowners allowed access for fee hunting. Twenty-eight percent of landowners provided access to their property for wildlife related activities, but <1% of these landowners earned income from it.

Katherine E. Golden, Christopher S. DePerno, Christopher E. Moorman, M. Nils Peterson, Robert E. Bardon

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 21-26

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2011

Acceptance of North Carolinians for Strategies to Manage Human-black Bear Interactions

In North Carolina, black bear (Ursus americanas) and human populations have steadily increased between 1971 and 2001. To test the hypotheses that acceptability of bear management actions varied in different management contexts and was dependent on respondents' sex, participation in hunting, and knowledge of black bears, we surveyed North Carolina residents in 2005.

Dain Palmer, Mark D. Jones, Colleen Olfenbuttel, David T. Cobb

Published July 6, 2021

Pages 27-31

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2011