Journal of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

The Journal of the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (ISSN 2330-5142) presents papers that cover all aspects of the management and conservation of inland, estuarine, and marine fisheries and wildlife. It aims to provide a forum where fisheries and wildlife managers can find innovative solutions to the problems facing our natural resources in the 21st century. The Journal welcomes manuscripts that cover scientific studies, case studies, and review articles on a wide range of topics of interest and use to fish and wildlife managers, with an emphasis on the southeastern United States.

 

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SEAFWA Journal Cover - Volume 8, March 2021
Article Year

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Evaluation of Split-Pond Systems for Production of Channel Catfish Fingerlings

Herbert E. Quintero, Luke A. Roy, Anita M. Kelly

Assessing alternative pond production systems that may reduce avian predation of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is of extreme interest to state/federal and private hatcheries. This study evaluated the culture of channel catfish fingerlings in a pilot-scale split-pond system (SPS) and compared it to traditional earthen ponds (TP). Six 0.04-ha ponds were covered by netting and stocked with channel catfish fingerlings at a rate of 200,000 fish ha–1; ponds were evenly split between TP and SPS. Fingerlings were cultured for 99 days and fed a commercial diet twice daily.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 1-8

Citation: Evaluation of Split-Pond Systems for Production of Channel Catfish Fingerlings, Herbert E. Quintero, Luke A. Roy, Anita M. Kelly, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 1-8, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Comparison of Bowfin Diets in the Upper Barataria Estuary and Atchafalaya River Basins of the Lower Mississippi River

Alexis V. Rixner, Allyse M. Ferrara, Quenton C. Fontenot

The life histories of many organisms are directly tied to floodplain inundation for access to spawning grounds, nurseries, and feeding, but many floodplain ecosystems have been altered by anthropogenic activities and are disconnected from associated rivers. The Atchafalaya River Basin (ARB) floodplain, Louisiana, is relatively intact, whereas the upper Barataria Estuary (UBE) has been separated from the Mississippi River by anthropogenic modifications and lacks an annual flood pulse.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 9-14

Citation: Comparison of Bowfin Diets in the Upper Barataria Estuary and Atchafalaya River Basins of the Lower Mississippi River, Alexis V. Rixner, Allyse M. Ferrara, Quenton C. Fontenot, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 9-14, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Seasonal Food Habits and Prey Selectivity of Alligator Gar from Texoma Reservoir, Oklahoma

Michael J. Porta, Richard A. Snow

Alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) were once viewed negatively by anglers and state agencies, but interest in reintroduction and trophy management of gar has increased in many states across their range, including Oklahoma. Therefore, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation is planning to reintroduce alligator gar back into their native range. Thus, biologists decided to implement a food habits study to determine potential impacts of alligator gar to other fish populations in order to address angler concerns about possible reintroduction.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 15-22

Citation: Seasonal Food Habits and Prey Selectivity of Alligator Gar from Texoma Reservoir, Oklahoma, Michael J. Porta, Richard A. Snow, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 15-22, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Angler Practices and Preferences for Managing Alligator Gar in Texas

Daniel J. Daugherty, David L. Buckmeier, J. Warren Schlechte, Nathan G. Smith

Some anglers have questioned Texas’ statewide one-a-day alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) regulation. Simulations suggested other regulations might be preferred; however, angler support for other regulations was unknown. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) administered an online survey in summer 2018 to measure attitudes and preferences of Texas alligator gar anglers. Respondents who fished for alligator gar (= 3980) were primarily Texas resident anglers; 68% fished for gar using a rod-and-reel, but 23% used bow-and-arrow.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 23-31

Citation: Angler Practices and Preferences for Managing Alligator Gar in Texas, Daniel J. Daugherty, David L. Buckmeier, J. Warren Schlechte, Nathan G. Smith, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 23-31, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Identifying Factors that Influence Angler Perceptions of Fishery Quality on State-owned Fishing Impoundments

Cecil A. Jennings, Hunter J. Roop, Neelam C. Poudyal

Literature on recreational fisheries has shown that many aspects of the fishing experience that are non-catch related influence angler satisfaction. However, satisfaction as an independent metric may fail to produce sufficient information regarding perceptions of fishing quality, which may be a more salient component of the fishing experience from a management perspective. Therefore, this study focused on what influences fishing quality in the minds of anglers.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 32-39

Citation: Identifying Factors that Influence Angler Perceptions of Fishery Quality on State-owned Fishing Impoundments, Cecil A. Jennings, Hunter J. Roop, Neelam C. Poudyal, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 32-39, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Conservation Status of Texas Freshwater Fishes: Informing State-based Species Protections

Gary P. Garrett, Kevin B. Mayes, Megan G. Bean, Sarah M. Robertson, Stephen G. Curtis, Timothy W. Birdsong

In Texas, freshwater fishes recognized as State Threatened or Endangered (STE) receive special attention when Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) consults with other agencies on projects that have the potential to alter freshwater systems. Regulatory oversight by TPWD of scientific and zoological collections, fish stockings, commercial fishing, disturbances to state-owned streambeds, and exotic species management must also ensure that no adverse impacts occur to STE freshwater fishes.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 40-52

Citation: Conservation Status of Texas Freshwater Fishes: Informing State-based Species Protections, Gary P. Garrett, Kevin B. Mayes, Megan G. Bean, Sarah M. Robertson, Stephen G. Curtis, Timothy W. Birdsong, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 40-52, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Development of a Decision Support Tool to Prioritize Estuarine and Marine Habitats for Restoration and Enhancement

Annie Roddenberry, Beacham Furse, Corey Anderson, Erin McDevitt, Jeff Beal, Jennifer Bock, Katie Konchar, Kent Smith, Maria Merrill

Marine and estuarine habitats of Florida are biologically productive and economically valuable. They provide a diversity of species with spawning grounds, nurseries, shelter, and food, augmenting fisheries production and supporting a vibrant natural resources-based economy. Additionally, these habitats shelter coastal areas from storm damage, maintain water quality, produce oxygen, and sequester carbon.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 53-64

Citation: Development of a Decision Support Tool to Prioritize Estuarine and Marine Habitats for Restoration and Enhancement, Annie Roddenberry, Beacham Furse, Corey Anderson, Erin McDevitt, Jeff Beal, Jennifer Bock, Katie Konchar, Kent Smith, Maria Merrill, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 53-64, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Capturing Minority Voices: A Focus Group Approach to Understanding Fishing Behavior in Alabama

Emily K. Nichols, Wayde C. Morse

Recreational fisheries planning and management relies on an engaged public with support in the form of fishing license sales and expenditures that fund operations and provide education and outreach services. To improve our understanding of two minority population segments with low historic participation in freshwater recreational fishing in Alabama, we examined their fishing participation and non-participation behaviors using focus groups.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 65-74

Citation: Capturing Minority Voices: A Focus Group Approach to Understanding Fishing Behavior in Alabama, Emily K. Nichols, Wayde C. Morse, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 65-74, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Influence of Soil Amendment on Forage Quality and Vegetation Structure in Old-Field Plant Communities

Bonner L. Powell, Craig A. Harper, J. Wade GeFellers, Lindsey M. Phillips, Mark A. Turner

Old-field plant communities provide habitat components for several game species, including white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Prescribed fire, herbicide application, and disking are commonly applied to improve forage and cover within old fields, but plant response on sites with nutrient-poor soils is not always favorable.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 75-83

Citation: Influence of Soil Amendment on Forage Quality and Vegetation Structure in Old-Field Plant Communities, Bonner L. Powell, Craig A. Harper, J. Wade GeFellers, Lindsey M. Phillips, Mark A. Turner, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 75-83, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Does Amount of Urban Area Around Predominantly Rural Banding Sites for Mourning Doves Affect Harvest in the Carolinas?

Joseph C. Fuller, Michael F. Small, Michael W. Hook, William F. Dukes, Jr.

Mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) are among the most abundant and harvested game birds in North America. As such, their population abundance and vital rates are annually monitored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in cooperation with state agencies. Current monitoring indicates a decline in absolute abundance across a large portion of its range in the United States, raising concerns.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 84-88

Citation: Does Amount of Urban Area Around Predominantly Rural Banding Sites for Mourning Doves Affect Harvest in the Carolinas?, Joseph C. Fuller, Michael F. Small, Michael W. Hook, William F. Dukes, Jr., Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 84-88, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Aerial Strip-transect Surveys: Indexing Autumn-winter Waterbird Abundance and Distribution in South Carolina

B. E. Ross, G. L. Wilkerson, M. R. Kneece, N.M. Masto, P. D. Gerard, R. M. Kaminski

Aerial surveys integrating probability-based sample designs have been implemented successfully to estimate relative abundance of wintering ducks in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Missouri, but these approaches have not been evaluated in the Atlantic Flyway except for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) along the Atlantic coast. Furthermore, these surveys have not been used to index abundance of other nonbreeding waterbirds.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 89-100

Citation: Aerial Strip-transect Surveys: Indexing Autumn-winter Waterbird Abundance and Distribution in South Carolina, B. E. Ross, G. L. Wilkerson, M. R. Kneece, N.M. Masto, P. D. Gerard, R. M. Kaminski, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 89-100, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

Potential Spatial Barriers to Black Bear Dispersal and Population Connectivity in Alabama

Hannah J. Leeper, Todd D. Steury

Corridors are important for many species, especially black bears (Ursus americanus), which use corridors for juvenile dispersal and connectivity among local and regional populations. Black bears are native throughout Alabama; however, historic populations have diminished, in part from habitat degradation and decreased connectivity. At present, only two small populations of black bears occur in Alabama. One is a newly recolonized population in northern Alabama, whose numbers are growing quickly.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 101-107

Citation: Potential Spatial Barriers to Black Bear Dispersal and Population Connectivity in Alabama, Hannah J. Leeper, Todd D. Steury, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 101-107, published March 1, 2021

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2021

SEAFWA Journal Volume 8, March 2021

How Decision Makers View Wildlife Conservation Challenges in the Southeast United States

Adam Terando, Kathryn Jewell, Kathryn T. Stevenson, M. Nils Peterson, Mallory Martin, Rachel Teseneer

Effective wildlife management requires understanding conservation challenges as defined by stakeholders and developing strategic responses to them. Outlining these challenges is the first step in wildlife management decision making. Research has documented how wildlife conservation practitioners and the public prioritize conservation issues, but little is known about the perspectives of people making conservation decisions, exposing a critical blind spot in efforts to effectively manage wildlife.

Published March 1, 2021, pages 108-116

Citation: How Decision Makers View Wildlife Conservation Challenges in the Southeast United States, Adam Terando, Kathryn Jewell, Kathryn T. Stevenson, M. Nils Peterson, Mallory Martin, Rachel Teseneer, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 8, pages 108-116, published March 1, 2021

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2021
SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020 cover
Article Year

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Assessment of Stocking Advanced Fingerling Brown Trout in a North Carolina Tailrace

Chris J. Wood, David W. Goodfred, Jacob M. Rash

Bridgewater Tailrace (BWTR) is a 29-km waterway extending from Lake James to Lake Rhodhiss on the Catawba River in western North Carolina. An 18-km reach of the stream is classified as Special Regulation Trout Waters by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC)and is managed as a put-grow-and-take brown trout (Salmo trutta) fishery. Early studies demonstrated recruitment of stocked fingerling (25?75 mmTL) brown trout was highly variable and possibly impacted by elevated discharge water temperatures during late summer months.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 1-12

Citation: Assessment of Stocking Advanced Fingerling Brown Trout in a North Carolina Tailrace, Chris J. Wood, David W. Goodfred, Jacob M. Rash, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 1-12, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Using an Angler Creel Survey to Supplement a Stocked Trout Fishery Evaluation in a North Carolina Reservoir

Amanda M. Bushon, Andrew P. Wheeler, David L. Yow, Jacob M. Rash

Creel surveys are a common method for collecting information from anglers, and when biological data are sparse, can provide needed data to help biologists evaluate fisheries. For instance, only 272 trout were collected in gill-net and electrofishing samples conducted annually from 2012-2015 to evaluate an experimental trout fishery in Apalachia Reservoir, North Carolina. Thus, we conducted a 12-mo, non-uniform probability creel survey to determine the return of stocked trout to anglers.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 13-19

Citation: Using an Angler Creel Survey to Supplement a Stocked Trout Fishery Evaluation in a North Carolina Reservoir, Amanda M. Bushon, Andrew P. Wheeler, David L. Yow, Jacob M. Rash, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 13-19, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Trout Growth and Mortality Following Water Quality and Flow Improvements on the Lower Saluda River in South Carolina

Ronald Ahle, Jason Bettinger

The lower Saluda River (LSR) supports a coldwater, put-grow-and-take trout fishery due to hypolimnetic releases from the Saluda Hydroelectric Project. The LSR has historically been noted for low flows (5.1 m3 sec-1) transitioning abruptly to peaking flows up to 509.7 m3 sec-1 with seasonally hypoxic water. Recent relicensing resulted in changes in the Saluda Hydroelectric Project operation that were intended to improve habitat conditions downstream.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 20-32

Citation: Trout Growth and Mortality Following Water Quality and Flow Improvements on the Lower Saluda River in South Carolina, Ronald Ahle, Jason Bettinger, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 20-32, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Smallmouth Bass Population Characteristics and Minimum Length Limit Evaluation in Two Tennessee Rivers

Justin Spaulding, Mark Rogers

Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) are a popular sportfish in many Tennessee rivers. In the southernmost extent of the species native range, including Tennessee, smallmouth bass populations tend to display relatively fast growth rates and can benefit from harvest restrictions. Consistent with national trends, recreational access and use of Tennessee rivers has increased in recent years (e.g., paddlesports and angling), but quantitative assessments of this increased use on smallmouth bass fisheries are lacking.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 33-40

Citation: Smallmouth Bass Population Characteristics and Minimum Length Limit Evaluation in Two Tennessee Rivers, Justin Spaulding, Mark Rogers, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 33-40, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Evaluation of Two Sizes of Fingerling Smallmouth Bass Stocked into a South Carolina River

Jason Bettinger

Smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) have been stocked intermittently into the Broad River, South Carolina, since 1984, resulting in a popular fishery. Numbers and sizes of smallmouth bass stocked vary annually depending on availability. Two sizes of fingerling smallmouth bass are stocked; however, stocking efficacy of these sizes was unknown. Therefore, contribution and relative survival of small (mean TL=42 ? 0.3 mm) and large (mean TL=150 ? 1.5 mm) fingerling smallmouth bass stocked during 2005?2010 into the Broad River was evaluated by differentially marking with oxytetracycline.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 41-48

Citation: Evaluation of Two Sizes of Fingerling Smallmouth Bass Stocked into a South Carolina River, Jason Bettinger, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 41-48, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Interannual Variability in Spatial and Temporal Spawning Distributions of White Bass in the Arkansas River

Brandon W. Baker, Steve E. Lochmann

There is a limited understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of tributary use for riverine populations of white bass (Morone chrysops) during the spawning season. We sampled white bass in 10 tributaries of Arkansas River Pool 4 during their spawning season in 2010 and 2011. Each tributary was sampled using boat-mounted electrofishing every third week during the spawning season to assess spatial variability of white bass spawning.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 49-57

Citation: Interannual Variability in Spatial and Temporal Spawning Distributions of White Bass in the Arkansas River, Brandon W. Baker, Steve E. Lochmann, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 49-57, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Diet and Population Characteristics of Stocked Age-0 Saugeye in an Oklahoma Reservoir

Michael J. Porta, Daniel E. Shoup, Richard A. Snow

Fish growth early in life typically affects recruitment to adulthood. For this reason, fisheries managers stock fish of varying sizes (e.g., fingerling or advanced fingerling rather than fry, which are less expensive to produce) hoping that an initial size advantage results in improved survival. Saugeye (Sander vitreus x S. canadensis) are hatchery-produced hybrids that are stocked into many Midwestern and southern U.S. reservoirs to create sportfishing opportunities. A saugeye stocking program was initiated at Arcadia Reservoir, Oklahoma, in 2017 when 38,110 fingerlings were stocked.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 58-63

Citation: Diet and Population Characteristics of Stocked Age-0 Saugeye in an Oklahoma Reservoir, Michael J. Porta, Daniel E. Shoup, Richard A. Snow, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 58-63, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Comparison of Browned and Standard Otolith Preparation Methods for Estimating Age of Catfish in Oklahoma

Micah J. Waters, Richard A. Snow, Michael J. Porta

Catfish are highly regarded by recreational anglers as sportfish in some areas of North America and are intensively managed by fisheries biologists. Accurate population metrics (e.g., growth, mortality, recruitment, age, and size at maturity) are essential to manage these fisheries, which relies on accurate age estimates for fish in these populations. When otoliths are used for age estimation, they are typically sectioned or ground in a transverse plane, but otolith preparation prior to sectioning may differ.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 64-71

Citation: Comparison of Browned and Standard Otolith Preparation Methods for Estimating Age of Catfish in Oklahoma, Micah J. Waters, Richard A. Snow, Michael J. Porta, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 64-71, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Age Estimate Precision of Bluegill and Redear Sunfish Using Broken and Whole Otoliths

Michael J. Porta, Shelby E. Jeter, Richard A. Snow

Age estimate precision is essential for fisheries managers when evaluating age structure, growth, and mortality rates for fish populations; therefore, establishing the method with the greatest precision for a particular species is critical. We compared ages estimated from broken and whole otoliths of 693 bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and 432 redear sunfish (L. microlophus) from five small impoundments (6.5?101 ha) in Oklahoma. Bluegill ages ranged from 0 to 10, and redear sunfish ranged from 0 to 9.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 72-77

Citation: Age Estimate Precision of Bluegill and Redear Sunfish Using Broken and Whole Otoliths, Michael J. Porta, Shelby E. Jeter, Richard A. Snow, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 72-77, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Effects of Incubation Temperature and Parental Male Species on Hatching Success and Progeny Performance of Channel Catfish and Hybrid Catfish

Nagaraj G. Chatakondi

Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) x blue catfish (I. furcatus) hybrid fry production is variable and inconsistent in hatcheries, and there is sometimes an unsatisfactory reduction in the yield of viable fry that occurs during the final weeks of a spawning season. There are several possible reasons for these inconsistencies of production—this study investigates two: hatchery water temperature and the species of the parental male.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 78-83

Citation: Effects of Incubation Temperature and Parental Male Species on Hatching Success and Progeny Performance of Channel Catfish and Hybrid Catfish, Nagaraj G. Chatakondi, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 78-83, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Alligator Gar Reproduction, Growth, and Recruitment in Falcon Reservoir, Texas

Randall Myers, Mitchell Nisbet, Susanna Harrison

Research on alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) has increased during the last two decades; however, assessments of reproduction, growth, and recruitment remain limited for reservoir populations. We collected a total of 562 alligator gar from Falcon Reservoir, Texas, in 2014 and 2018 to estimate onset of maturity, fecundity, timing of spawning, and growth. Additionally, we modeled the relationship between spawning habitat availability and strong year-class occurrence. Age of maturity (50% mature) was 5.6 years for females and 1.2 years for males.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 84-92

Citation: Alligator Gar Reproduction, Growth, and Recruitment in Falcon Reservoir, Texas, Randall Myers, Mitchell Nisbet, Susanna Harrison, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 84-92, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Effect of Temperature on Respiratory Responses to Increasing Hypoxia for Five Species of Nongame Stream Fishes

Nathan R. Hartline, Dennis R. DeVries, Russell A. Wright, James A. Stoeckel, Lindsay M. Horne

Understanding the ability of fishes to tolerate low dissolved oxygen (DO) is important not only to our understanding of the ecology of aquatic systems, but also for flow management in regulated lotic systems. Historical flow management guidelines have been based on critical oxygen concen- trations and incipient lethal levels from just a few species, and data on nongame fish species are lacking. Here we quantify respiration rate, critical DO concentration at routine metabolic rate, and regulatory capacity across temperatures for five nongame fish species.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 93-102

Citation: Effect of Temperature on Respiratory Responses to Increasing Hypoxia for Five Species of Nongame Stream Fishes, Nathan R. Hartline, Dennis R. DeVries, Russell A. Wright, James A. Stoeckel, Lindsay M. Horne, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 93-102, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Congratulations on Your Promotion to Management: Considerations for New Supervisory Biologists

Carolyn Belcher, Cecil A. Jennings, Dennis Riecke, Donald Dennerline, James Long, Kurt Kuklinski, Mark Rogers, Michael Allen, Patricia Mazik, Robert Bringolf, Taconya Goar

New supervisory biologists can find themselves tasked with operational responsibilities (e.g., personnel, budgets, procurement, safety) with limited formal training in those areas. This sometimes sudden role change can be jolting, but it need not be debilitating. Here we present information and guidance on various topics ranging from recruiting new personnel and conducting performance evaluations to maintaining a sound safety program as well as confronting legal considerations regarding personal and institutional liabilities for job-related issues.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 103-113

Citation: Congratulations on Your Promotion to Management: Considerations for New Supervisory Biologists, Carolyn Belcher, Cecil A. Jennings, Dennis Riecke, Donald Dennerline, James Long, Kurt Kuklinski, Mark Rogers, Michael Allen, Patricia Mazik, Robert Bringolf, Taconya Goar, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 103-113, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Texas River Access and Conservation Areas: A Case Study in Use of Riparian Leases to Enhance Angler Access and Facilitate River Stewardship

Timothy W. Birdsong, Stephan Magnelia, John Botros, Megan Bean, Alana Hoffman, M. Melissa Parker, Sarah Robertson

Texas contains 307,752 km of streams, creeks and rivers, including 64,686 km of perennially flowing waters. The state maintains public navigability laws that ensure the rights of paddlers and anglers to wade and float many Texas creeks and rivers. However, private ownership of riverbanks limits the number of locations where the public can legally access those waters from land.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 114-122

Citation: Texas River Access and Conservation Areas: A Case Study in Use of Riparian Leases to Enhance Angler Access and Facilitate River Stewardship, Timothy W. Birdsong, Stephan Magnelia, John Botros, Megan Bean, Alana Hoffman, M. Melissa Parker, Sarah Robertson, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 114-122, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico: Effects on Reservoir Water Quality and Fish Community Structure and Resilience

Bryant M. Haley, J. Wesley Neal, Zachary S. Moran

Hurricane Maria, a Category 4 storm with sustained winds of 249 km h?1, made landfall on Puerto Rico on 20 September 2017. The extreme precipitation resulting from this hurricane, combined with already saturated soil and the steep, mountainous terrain of the island, led to historic flooding across most of Puerto Rico. Reservoirs in many of the river systems on the island were preemptively drawn down in an attempt to absorb the volume of floodwaters but were quickly overwhelmed.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 123-133

Citation: Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico: Effects on Reservoir Water Quality and Fish Community Structure and Resilience, Bryant M. Haley, J. Wesley Neal, Zachary S. Moran, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 123-133, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Relationship Between Water Quality and Relative Weight of Four Sportfish Species in Oklahoma Impoundments

Austin Griffin, Bruce Hoagland, Kurt Kuklinski

This project sought to classify 108 Oklahoma impoundments based on water quality as well as determine if water-quality parameters in these impoundments influenced the relative weight (Wr) of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), white crappie (Pomoxis annularis) and black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Agglomerative hierarchical clustering and subsequent discriminant analysis of seven water-quality parameters resulted in the grouping of impoundments into three classes.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 134-163

Citation: Relationship Between Water Quality and Relative Weight of Four Sportfish Species in Oklahoma Impoundments, Austin Griffin, Bruce Hoagland, Kurt Kuklinski, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 134-163, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Evaluating Material Type and Configuration of Plastic Attractors on Fish Use in a Texas Reservoir

M. Todd Driscoll, J. Warren Schlechte, Daniel J. Daugherty, Sarah E. Haas

State fisheries agencies are increasingly conducting habitat enhancement projects due to reservoir aging and associated habitat degradation, and evaluations of the effectiveness of habitat introductions are crucial to ensure desired results. Artificial habitat structures built from plastics may last for decades, yet their effectiveness has been variable?possibly due to construction materials,shape, and placement.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 144-152

Citation: Evaluating Material Type and Configuration of Plastic Attractors on Fish Use in a Texas Reservoir, M. Todd Driscoll, J. Warren Schlechte, Daniel J. Daugherty, Sarah E. Haas, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 144-152, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Assessing Angler Use and Demographics at Three Small Impoundments using Trail Cameras

Lawrence Dorsey

Trail cameras were deployed from 1 October 2015 through 30 September 2016 to measure angling effort at three lakes on the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Sandhills Game Lands. Images were quantified via computer software and analyses were conducted to assess total angling effort as well as temporal (e.g., AM vs. PM, weekday vs. weekend, and seasonal effort), angling method (boat vs. bank), and demographic (male vs. female, youth vs. adult) calculations.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 153-158

Citation: Assessing Angler Use and Demographics at Three Small Impoundments using Trail Cameras, Lawrence Dorsey, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 153-158, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Eastern Wild Turkey Response to Hunting Feral Hogs with Dogs

Alaina P. Gerrits, Patrick H. Wightman, Jay R. Cantrell, Charles R. Ruth, Michael J. Chamberlain, Bret A. Collier

Impacts of feral hogs (Sus scrofa) on native plant and animal communities have increased as feral hogs have expanded in geographic range. Wildlife managers use a host of tactics to manage population growth of feral hogs, including recreational hunting with dogs. However, hunting with dogs can cause disturbance and behavioral changes to non-target species. We monitored 161 eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) over 147 days during 2014-2018 in South Carolina to evaluate turkey movement behaviors and range sizes before, during, and after spring feral hog-dog hunts.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 159-163

Citation: Eastern Wild Turkey Response to Hunting Feral Hogs with Dogs, Alaina P. Gerrits, Patrick H. Wightman, Jay R. Cantrell, Charles R. Ruth, Michael J. Chamberlain, Bret A. Collier, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 159-163, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Nesting Activity and Nest Site Characteristics of a Translocated Eastern Wild Turkey Population in East Texas

Daniel J. Sullivan, Micah L. Poteet, Bret A. Collier, Michael J. Chamberlain

Sustainability of eastern wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris, hereafter turkey) populations following translocation is dependent on reproductive success. Extensive efforts to restore turkeys to east Texas using translocation have yielded mixed results, leading to low-density, fragmented populations. Dynamics of a translocated turkey population are dependent on the outcome of nesting activity and nest success which can be influenced by vegetative characteristics selected by females when nesting.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 164-171

Citation: Nesting Activity and Nest Site Characteristics of a Translocated Eastern Wild Turkey Population in East Texas, Daniel J. Sullivan, Micah L. Poteet, Bret A. Collier, Michael J. Chamberlain, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 164-171, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Evaluating Reproductive Parameters of Rio Grande Wild Turkeys to Guide Policy Decisions in Texas

Bret A. Collier, David Forrester, David J. Moscicki, Jacob H. White, Jason Hardin, Michael J. Chamberlain

Historically, Rio Grande wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo intermedia) in south central Texas have been at lower densities than in other por-tions of the state. Within the Oak-Prairie Wildlife District of Texas, Rio Grande wild turkey regulatory restrictions are different for counties in the east- ern and western portions of the region.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 172-182

Citation: Evaluating Reproductive Parameters of Rio Grande Wild Turkeys to Guide Policy Decisions in Texas, Bret A. Collier, David Forrester, David J. Moscicki, Jacob H. White, Jason Hardin, Michael J. Chamberlain, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 172-182, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Bait Preference and Banding Cost Analysis for Mourning Doves in the Chenier Plain of Southwest Louisiana

James M. Whitaker, Joseph R. Marty, Samantha A. Collins, Miah S. Lognion, Daniel U. Greene

The mourning dove (Zenaida macroura; hereafter dove) is among the most iconic symbols for hunting in the southeastern United States. Con-servation and management of this species is a priority for many state wildlife management agencies. Annual banding efforts are one of the main meth-ods used to measure survival and recovery rates, which aid in harvest management recommendations. We examined a number of dove captures using five different bait types over a two-year period in southwestern Louisiana and performed a banding cost analysis.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 183-188

Citation: Bait Preference and Banding Cost Analysis for Mourning Doves in the Chenier Plain of Southwest Louisiana, James M. Whitaker, Joseph R. Marty, Samantha A. Collins, Miah S. Lognion, Daniel U. Greene, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 183-188, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Survival and Recovery of Mottled Ducks in Coastal South Carolina, 2008-2018

Dean E. Harrigal, J. Brian Davis, Joseph D. Lancaster, Molly R. Kneece

Mottled ducks are typically geographically separated into two sub-species: peninsular Florida (Anas fulvigula fulvigula) and the western Gulf Coastal (WGC) (A. f. maculosa). Between 1975 and 1983, >1,200 mottled ducks were introduced to coastal South Carolina primarily from the WGC range. A late summer banding program was initiated in 2008 within the Santee Delta and the Ashepoo, Combahee, and Edisto Rivers Basin in South Carolina to estimate mottled duck survival and harvest probability. We acquired 3,594 banding and 525 recovery records of mottled ducks banded between 2008-2018.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 189-194

Citation: Survival and Recovery of Mottled Ducks in Coastal South Carolina, 2008-2018, Dean E. Harrigal, J. Brian Davis, Joseph D. Lancaster, Molly R. Kneece, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 189-194, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Assessing Genetic Diversity of Migratory and Non-migratory Birds in a Rapidly Developing Region of the Georgia Piedmont

Jill Penn, Maribel Fernandez, Mia Malloy, Priya Babu, Jessica James, Angie Nguyen

Species richness, abundance, and genetic variability often decrease in bird populations when their habitats are subjected to anthropogenic activity. Regular and early monitoring of genetic diversity can give researchers and wildlife managers insight into the genetic health of populations so that action can be taken before inbreeding, loss of disease resistance, and population declines occur. We measured genetic diversity in populations of avian species that are increasingly exposed to anthropogenic changes.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 195-201

Citation: Assessing Genetic Diversity of Migratory and Non-migratory Birds in a Rapidly Developing Region of the Georgia Piedmont, Jill Penn, Maribel Fernandez, Mia Malloy, Priya Babu, Jessica James, Angie Nguyen, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 195-201, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Behavioral Responses of Female White-tailed Deer to Small Game Hunting Activities

Nicholas W. Bakner, Steven S. Madere, Johnathan Bordelon, Scott Durham, Bret A. Collier

Environmental and anthropogenic stimuli can impact a variety of species' behavioral ecology. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) re- spond both spatially and temporally to various types of disturbance; however, our understanding of how disturbance impacts deer behavior is typically regulated to studies where white-tailed deer are the targeted species.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 202-209

Citation: Behavioral Responses of Female White-tailed Deer to Small Game Hunting Activities, Nicholas W. Bakner, Steven S. Madere, Johnathan Bordelon, Scott Durham, Bret A. Collier, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 202-209, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Best Management Practices and Current Status of Dog-Deer Hunting in the Southeastern United States

Gino J. D'Angelo, Thomas J. Prebyl, David A. Osborn, Jacalyn P. Rosenberger

Hunting white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with dogs (herein, dog-deer hunting) has been steeped in tradition and controversy. Today in the United States, dog-deer hunting for white-tailed deer only occurs in nine states of the Southeast. We reviewed hunting regulations and primary literature, interviewed state-agency biologists, and simulated deer movements on national forests to investigate the current status of dog-deer hunting and develop recommendations for best practices to manage methods associated with the tradition.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 210-220

Citation: Best Management Practices and Current Status of Dog-Deer Hunting in the Southeastern United States, Gino J. D'Angelo, Thomas J. Prebyl, David A. Osborn, Jacalyn P. Rosenberger, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 210-220, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Field Evaluation of a Commercial Feeder to Control Wild Pigs

Jeffrey P. Duguay, Maria Davidson, James Lacour, Tony Vidrine

Wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations have exploded across much of the southeastern United States. In order to combat increasing wild pig num- bers in an effort to reduce both ecological and economic damage caused by wild pigs, toxicant baits are being investigated as a possible method to reduce wild pig numbers at the local scale. In fall 2017, we tested the HogStopper? feeder to ascertain if this feeder design would deliver bait to wild pigs while preventing non-target species from accessing bait.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 221-226

Citation: Field Evaluation of a Commercial Feeder to Control Wild Pigs, Jeffrey P. Duguay, Maria Davidson, James Lacour, Tony Vidrine, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 221-226, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Characterizing American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) Highway Crossing Locations in Central Georgia

Michael J. Hooker, David A. Jared, Robert J. Warren, Karl V. Miller, Michael J. Chamberlain

Te Central Georgia Bear Population (CGBP) is of special conservation concern due to its relatively small population size and isolation from other bear populations in the southeastern United States. Plans to widen Georgia State Route (SR) 96, which bisects the CGBP, have potential to negatively impact the population. Highway underpasses are being planned to mitigate these impacts. During 2012-2015, we captured and ftted 63 American black bears (Ursus americanus) with global-positioning-system collars and used remote, infrared cameras to document bear crossings along SR 96.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 227-237

Citation: Characterizing American Black Bear (Ursus americanus) Highway Crossing Locations in Central Georgia, Michael J. Hooker, David A. Jared, Robert J. Warren, Karl V. Miller, Michael J. Chamberlain, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 227-237, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Participation in Select Nature-based Recreational Activities by Rural Mississippi Youth

Katherine E. Abell, Leslie M. Burger

Recruitment and retention of future conservationists are key issues for many natural resources agencies and organizations. Engaging chil-

Published July 6, 2021, pages 238-245

Citation: Participation in Select Nature-based Recreational Activities by Rural Mississippi Youth, Katherine E. Abell, Leslie M. Burger, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 238-245, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Wildlife-related Recreation Impacts on Rural Land Values

W. Daryl Jones, Jerry Brashier, Jeanne C. Jones, Ian A. Munn, Stephen C. Grado

We conducted a survey to evaluate 2003-2008 sales of private rural lands in Mississippi that were purchased for wildlife-related recreational

Published July 6, 2021, pages 246-254

Citation: Wildlife-related Recreation Impacts on Rural Land Values, W. Daryl Jones, Jerry Brashier, Jeanne C. Jones, Ian A. Munn, Stephen C. Grado, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 246-254, published July 6, 2021

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2020

SEAFWA Journal Volume 7, March 2020

Using Trail Cameras to Assess Recreation in Hellbender Streams of North Carolina National Forests

Shem D. Unger, Lori A. Williams, Charles R. Lawson, John D. Groves

Each year the number of recreational visitors to southeastern national forests increases which brings new challenges for wildlife managers related to visitor activity and their potential effects of visitors on natural resources. This increasing visitation and recreation may affect species inhab-iting streams if these habitats are modified by visitors. North Carolina includes some of the last stable populations of a fully aquatic salamander, the eastern hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis).

Published July 6, 2021, pages 255-262

Citation: Using Trail Cameras to Assess Recreation in Hellbender Streams of North Carolina National Forests, Shem D. Unger, Lori A. Williams, Charles R. Lawson, John D. Groves, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 7, pages 255-262, published July 6, 2021

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2020
SEAFWA Journal Volume 6, March 2019 cover
Article Year

SEAFWA Journal Volume 6, March 2019

Increasing Largemouth Bass Carrying Capacity Using Destratification: A Case Study

J. Wesley Neal

Aeration can circulate waters by disrupting thermal density differences associated with stratification, allowing homogenization of tempera- ture, oxygen, and other physicochemical characteristics within the water body. Use of lake and pond destratification as a management tool has been increasing in recent years, yet data are limited regarding its effects on fish communities. This case study examines the response of a largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) population to destratification in a 2.4-ha pond over nearly a decade.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 1-8

Citation: Increasing Largemouth Bass Carrying Capacity Using Destratification: A Case Study, , Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 6, pages 1-8, published July 6, 2021

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2019

SEAFWA Journal Volume 6, March 2019

Sociodemographic and Economic Characteristics of Black Bass Anglers Participating in Different Tournament Types on Lake Guntersville, Alabama

Michael J. Maceina Patrick L. Snellings, Terry R. Hanson, Diane Hite

We described sociodemographics and expenditures of black bass (Micropterus spp.) anglers participating in eight different tournament types on Lake Guntersville, Alabama, in 2013. We estimated 9035 anglers fished in 259 tournaments. Most anglers were middle- to older-age Caucasian males with an annual household income of over US$75,000, and who had participated in tournaments for over 15 years. Travel distance, expenditures, non-Caucasian participants, residence location, number of times fishing on Lake Guntersville, entry fees, and club membership all differed among tournament types.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 9-18

Citation: Sociodemographic and Economic Characteristics of Black Bass Anglers Participating in Different Tournament Types on Lake Guntersville, Alabama, Patrick L. Snellings, Terry R. Hanson, Diane Hite, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 6, pages 9-18, published July 6, 2021

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2019

SEAFWA Journal Volume 6, March 2019

Stocking of Advanced-Size Largemouth Bass in Two Estuarine Creeks and a Freshwater Impoundment in Southwest Alabama

David L. Armstrong, Jr. Tommy R. Purcell, Ryan Peaslee

The Mobile-Tensaw Delta is an 8231-ha oligohaline, tidal estuary that supports a popular largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) fishery. This system is productive, with an abundant bass population and above-average recruitment to age-1. But recruitment of the 2004 year-class was poor post-Hurricane Ivan, prompting angler concerns about the population. We considered improvements in the fishery were most likely achieved by stock- ing advanced-size fingerlings.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 19-27

Citation: Stocking of Advanced-Size Largemouth Bass in Two Estuarine Creeks and a Freshwater Impoundment in Southwest Alabama, Tommy R. Purcell, Ryan Peaslee, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 6, pages 19-27, published July 6, 2021

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2019

SEAFWA Journal Volume 6, March 2019

Angler Catch and Harvest of Targeted Sportfishes in Small Georgia Lakes

Hunter J. Roop Neelam C. Poudyal, Cecil A. Jennings

Public fishing areas (PFAs) in Georgia are intensively managed freshwater impoundments that provide a variety of fishing opportunities to an- glers. Management efforts and fishing regulations at these PFAs depend on understanding basic aspects of recreational fishing pressure, catch, and har- vest. Accordingly, we conducted a roving creel survey during January–December 2013 at Marben PFA in middle Georgia to quantify sport fishing total effort, catch, harvest, and fish catch by species, number, and weight in 14 lakes.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 28-34

Citation: Angler Catch and Harvest of Targeted Sportfishes in Small Georgia Lakes, Neelam C. Poudyal, Cecil A. Jennings, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 6, pages 28-34, published July 6, 2021

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2019

SEAFWA Journal Volume 6, March 2019

Evaluation of Supplemental Pellet Feeding and Threadfin Shad Addition on Stable Isotope Signature and Potential Influence on Fish Growth in Recreational Fishing Ponds

Hugh K. Henderson Russell A. Wright, Dennis R. DeVries, Matthew J. Catalano, David C. Glover

Pond enhancements such as adding pelleted feed or stocking threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense) are sometimes used in the management of pond fisheries, but their relative impacts on growth and reproduction at multiple levels of the food web are not often fully evaluated.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 35-43

Citation: Evaluation of Supplemental Pellet Feeding and Threadfin Shad Addition on Stable Isotope Signature and Potential Influence on Fish Growth in Recreational Fishing Ponds, Russell A. Wright, Dennis R. DeVries, Matthew J. Catalano, David C. Glover, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 6, pages 35-43, published July 6, 2021

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2019

SEAFWA Journal Volume 6, March 2019

Comparison of Otoliths and Scales in Estimating Age of Redbreast Sunfish and Green Sunfish in the Yellow River Watershed, Georgia

Peter C. Sakaris Jesse J. Sunga, Jessica N. Coover

Population-level studies often require age estimation of fish, but populations in small rivers and streams are generally smaller than those in large rivers or reservoirs. Therefore, non-lethal aging methods are generally recommended to minimize the potentially negative effects of sampling on population size. Accordingly, our main goal was to compare otoliths and scales as structures for estimating the age of redbreast sunfish (Lepomis auri- tus) and green sunfish (L. cyanellus) in an urban watershed.

Published July 6, 2021, pages 44-50

Citation: Comparison of Otoliths and Scales in Estimating Age of Redbreast Sunfish and Green Sunfish in the Yellow River Watershed, Georgia, Jesse J. Sunga, Jessica N. Coover, Journal of the Southeastern Assoc. of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Volume 6, pages 44-50, published July 6, 2021

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2019