David T. Cobb

The Effects of Tillage on Shot Concentrations in Dove Fields

SEAFWA Journal Volume 3, March 2016

Despite the research on lead (Pb) shot deposition and ingestion by mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), there has been no research to determine how management practices may be used to effectively reduce Pb shot concentrations in fields managed for dove hunting. For instance, no-till cropping systems could potentially lead to accumulation of lead shot in upper soil layers compared to conventional tillage practices. We measured shot concentrations in five publicly managed mourning dove fields in North Carolina to determine if concentration levels were significantly affected by tillage...

Year
2016

Occupancy of Large Canids in Eastern North Carolina - A Pilot Study

SEAFWA Journal Volume 3, March 2016

We used camera traps to estimate detection and occupancy of radio-collared and non-collared red wolves, coyotes, and red wolf-coyote hybrids (Canis rufus, C. latrans, and C. rufus x C. latrans) in Hyde County, North Carolina. This pilot study was to determine these variables among species and compare them between private and public lands. Large canids occurred throughout the public lands sampled, but occupancy of radio-collared individuals was low (0.41). Estimated occupancy of large canids throughout the study area was 0.74 with an estimated detection of 0.05. Occupancy of non-collared...

Year
2016

Assessing the Feasibility of a Sustainable, Huntable Elk Population in North Carolina

SEAFWA Journal Volume 3, March 2016

Elk were introduced in 2001 to the Cataloochee Valley area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM). In 2008, the National Park Service transferred responsibility for elk management outside GRSM to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC). Expansion of elk outside of GRSM boundaries presents recreational opportunities for residents and tourists but also increases human-elk conflict and associated property damage, cost of preventive action, and administrative burden for NCWRC staff. Therefore, NCWRC commissioned an integrated biological, economic, and social assessment...

Year
2016

Elk Habitat Suitability Map for North Carolina

SEAFWA Journal Volume 2, March 2015

Although eastern elk (Cervus elaphus canadensis) were extirpated from the eastern United States in the 19th century, they were successfully reintroduced in the North Carolina portion of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in the early 2000s. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) is evaluating the prospect of reintroducing the species in other locations in the state to augment recreational opportunities. As a first step in the process, we created a state-wide elk habitat suitability map. We used medium-scale data sets and a two-component approach to iden- tify areas...

Year
2015

Hunter Use of Publicly Managed Mourning Dove Fields

SEAFWA Journal Volume 1, March 2014

We attempted to quantify hunter use in five publicly managed mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) fields during the 2007 and 2008 dove hunting seasons on Conoho Farms (CF) in Martin County, North Carolina. Self-administered diary surveys (n=845) were mailed to every individual receiving a special hunt (SH) and point-of-sale (PS) permit during both dove hunting seasons on CF. We used the modified Tailored Design method to collect hunter effort and harvest data for each hunting season. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test to determine differences in hunter effort and harvest between...

Year
2014

Acceptance of North Carolinians for Strategies to Manage Human-black Bear Interactions

In North Carolina, black bear (Ursus americanas) and human populations have steadily increased between 1971 and 2001. To test the hypotheses that acceptability of bear management actions varied in different management contexts and was dependent on respondents' sex, participation in hunting, and knowledge of black bears, we surveyed North Carolina residents in 2005. We asked questionnaire recipients about the acceptability of educating the public on dealing with bear problems, frightening a bear with tools such as rubber bullets or fireworks, or destroying a bear in the following...

Year
2011

Understanding Angler and Hunter Annual Spending in North Carolina

Given the economic importance of fishing and hunting and the pervasive declines in these activities, it is essential that natural resource planners and managers understand factors influencing angler and hunter spending. We conducted a mail survey of a random sample (n = 844) of North Carolina fishing and hunting license holders. On average, anglers spent US$964 and hunters spent $1,437 annually. The model that best explained annual angler expenditures included gender, age, number of days spent fishing annually, total value of their equipment, income, whether someone in their household...

Year
2010

Managing Black Bears on a Public Game Land in North Carolina: Are the Desires of Hunters Compatible with Unrestricted Public Hunting?

We used mail surveys to examine attitudes and methods of black bear (Ursus americanus) hunters on Van Swamp Game Land (Van Swamp). Van Swamp was located in eastern North Carolina and managed as an open public hunting area, with no restriction on hunter numbers or vehicular access. Reported bear harvest was higher in 2001 (22) than 2002 (4) or 2003 (8). Hunters in all three years generally believed that Van Swamp had “about the right number” of hunters (≥57%) and that “too many” bears had been harvested (≥38%). Retention of hunters from year to year was high (≥70%) and, generally, a...

Year
2006

Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance in North Carolina

Although chronic wasting disease (CWD) has not been documented in any samples (N = 2,447) collected in North Carolina, the potential biological, economical, and sociological implications associated with this disease are significant. Discovery of CWD in Wisconsin prompted the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) to implement a preventative disease management strategy in May 2002. Revisions to administrative rules pertaining to captive cervids were implemented, including testing, tagging, and inspection requirements. A short-term buyout program was established to compensate...

Year
2005

Selection of Focal Areas for Northern Bobwhite Habitat Enhancement on Private Lands in North Carolina

In August 2000, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission approved and funded the Cooperative Upland habitat Restoration and Enhancement (CURE) Program, an initiative to create and maintain early-successional upland habitat for the enhancement of northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) populations and associated early-successional species in North Carolina. As a part of the initial implementation of the CURE Program, our objectives were to identify specific geographic areas in North Carolina (focal areas) where the potential to restore and enhance bobwhite habitat and increase...

Year
2002