Michael R. Pelton

Food Habits of Coyotes in Northwestern Florida

Recent declines in deer densities in some areas of Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida, have prompted concerns regarding the impact of coyote (Canis latrans) predation. We determined the food habits of coyotes from analysis of 166 scats collected on Eglin AFB from November 1994 to October 1996. We compared the frequency of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) remains found in scats collected in high- and low-deer density areas during the deer fawning season to evaluate impacts of coyotes on white-tailed deer. Important coyote foods (by frequency of occurrence) were shrub/vine fruit (...

Year
1997

Proximity of Adult Female Black Bears to Limited Access Roads

Seven adult female black bears (Ursus americanus) were radio monitored from 1980 to 1982 in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Bears showed no avoidance of limited access roads and trails, frequently crossed roads and trails during any given 24-hour period, and used areas around them. Response to seasonally abundant food supplies, rather than avoidance or other behavioral adjustments by individual bears, seemed to determine whether bears crossed roads and trails and used areas around them in this protected population.

Year
1984

Characteristics of Black Bear Cubs in the Southern Appalachians

Female black bears (Ursus americanus) were captured and radio collared in Cherokee National Forest (CNF) and Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) from 1980 to 1982. Whereas most females den in inaccessible tree cavities high above ground, during the 1981-82 winter, 66% in the CNF and GSMNP denned on the ground affording scientists the opportunity to directly examine 15 litters. Litter sizes ranged from 1 to 4 (x =2.58), were comparable with litter sizes reported from other parts of the United States, and were similar among age classes of females. Estimated litter sizes based on...

Year
1984

Activities of Black Bears in Cherokee National Forest, Tennessee

Radio-collars equipped with activity monitors were attached to 18 black bears (Ursus americanus) in Cherokee National Forest, Tennessee. Bears exhibited a crepuscular pattern of activity that varied seasonally. Activity levels were low after bears emerged from dens, escalated rapidly in June and July, reached a peak in August, and diminished gradually until denning. Activities of bears were affected by individual differences among bears, weather factors, and denning. Sex, age, and reproductive classes also affected activity patterns. Adult male bears were the most active group, whereas...

Year
1984

Evaluation Of A Raccoon Translocation Attempt In East Tennessee

A total of 286 western Tennessee raccoons (Procyon lotor) were ear-tagged and released in portions of Blount and Loudon Counties, eastern Tennessee, over a 3-year period. Twenty-nine (10.1%) were recovered. Illegal kills comprised 41.4% of all tag recoveries. Seven of I I recovered females had produced offspring. Weight gains averaged 1.14 kg over 432 days. Average linear dispersal was 4.9 km. Dispersal distances for males and females were not significantly different and dispersal directions were randomly distributed. Home ranges of 14 radio-monitored raccoons were not significantly...

Year
1979

Denning Behavior Of Black Bears In The Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Denning behavior of black bears (Ursus americanus) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was studied using motion sensitive radio-collars. All radioinstrumented bears (n = 29) entered dens and exhibited periods of decreased activity in the predenning and postdenning periods (n = 20). Denning behavior was characterized by a reduction in sensitivity, with females being more lethargic than males. Female bears departed fall ranges earlier (P

Year
1979

Winter Mortality Of Cottontail Rabbits On Beagle Field Trial Enclosures

Winter mortality of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus jloridanus) was studied within 2 beagle field trial enclosures. Population estimates based on live-trapping indicated a September to February mortality of 45 and 75% on the 2 areas. Predation by hawks and owls was the most important identifiable mortality factor on both enclosures. Flush censuses indicated that imported rabbits suffered a higher rate of mortality than native rabbits. Recommendations for the management of field trial grounds are given.

Year
1978

Some Population Parameters Of The Cades Cove Deer Herd, Great Smoky Mountains National Park

A study of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Cades Cove. Great Smoky Mountains National Park was conducted during the summer of 1977 to determine population density, herd behavior, habitat utilization, and neral condition of the herd. Thirty-seven counts were conducted and 2,172 deer observed. The minimum summer population was estimated at 519 deer using the method of bounded counts; the sex ratio was 90.8 bucks per 100 does. Fawn-at-heel counts yielded a ratio of 49.5 fawns per 100 does. Deer utilized hayfields and horse pastures but avoided cow pastures. Feeding was the...

Year
1978

Some Biochemical Parameters of Serum of European Wild Hogs

Blood samples were obtained from 70 European wild hogs (Susscrofa), of which 33 were live-trapped in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and 37 were reared in captivity on farms geographically proximal to the mountains. Sera were analyzed for chloride, potassium, sodium, glucose, blood urea nitrogen, total serum protein, albumin, alpha, beta and gamma globulins. The albumin/globulin ratio was calculated. Data were analyzed for the effects of sex, age, and location by least squares analysis of variance. With the exception of semm sodium, significant sex differences were not found. With...

Year
1975

Seasonal Food Habits of the European Wild Hog in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Information on seasonal food habits of the European wild hog (Sus serofa) was obtained by analyses of stomach contents of 128 animals collected in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park from 1971 to 1973. Hogs ate primarily plant material in all seasons. Grasses (Gramineae) were the most important food item in the spring and were also important to hogs in the summer, as were the fruits Gaylussacia spp., and Malus spp. Roots were the major food item in the fan and winter months, although the mast of Quercus spp. and Carya spp. was important when available. Animal matter consumed consisted...

Year
1975