David C. Guynn, Jr

Habitat-area Relationships of Shrub-scrub Birds in South Carolina

Non-game Wildlife Outstanding Technical Paper

Sensitivity to reductions in habitat area are widely accepted as a factor in the declines of many mature-forest passerines. Although evidence from a number of sources shows significant declines among many Neotropical migratory (NTMB) and temperate migrant (TMR) early-successional birds, little information exists regarding the potential for area-sensitivity in those species. Here we report the results of research on habitat-area considerations of birds in clearcut habitats in some upland forests in South Carolina. Using single, fixed-radius point counts in each clearcut, we measured avian...

Year
1998

Use of Mississippi Bottomland Hardwoods by White-tailed Deer

Nine white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) outfitted with radio collars were observed for 9 months or longer to monitor seasonal movements and habitat utilization. Estimates of seasonal home-range size, using a multivariate method, varied from 176 ha to 1245 ha, and annual home range size varied from 455 ha to 2216 ha. Average annual home ranges of 4 females (737 ha ± 219 SD) was about half the average home range of 5 males (l511 ha ± 571 SD). Habitat utilization/availability analysis demonstrated significantly greater (P < 0.05) utilization of dense bottomland hardwood sawtimber...

Year
1985

Use of Mississippi Bottomland Hardwoods by White-tailed Deer

Nine white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) outfitted with radio collars were observed for 9 months or longer to monitor seasonal movements and habitat utilization. Estimates of seasonal home-range size, using a multivariate method, varied from 176 ha to 1245 ha, and annual home range size varied from 455 ha to 2216 ha. Average annual home ranges of 4 females (737 ha ± 219 SD) was about half the average home range of 5 males (l511 ha ± 571 SD). Habitat utilization/availability analysis demonstrated significantly greater (P < 0.05) utilization of dense bottomland hardwood sawtimber...

Year
1985

Trapping Satisfactions Of Mississippi Trappers

Five-hundred twenty-seven trappers from a sample of 1000 responded to a mail survey designed to determine the reasons why they trap and the values that they associate with trapping. About 62 percent and 27 percent of the respondents indicated that sport and income, respectively, were the primary reasons that they trapped. Response to the question, "Why rlo you trap?" was significantly associated with age (P < 0.01)", experience (P = 0.01), anrl proportion of income derived from trapping (P < 0.01). Ranking of seven rlimensions of trapping satisfaction indicated that skill was the...

Year
1980