M. L. Kennedy

Use of Fertilized Honeysuckle by White-tailed Deer in Western Tennessee

Use of fertilized Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) by whitetailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) was examined by a marked-plant and twig procedure to assess the potential for utilizing naturally-occurring foods that have been enhanced by fertilization in deer management. We conducted the study on the Milan Army Ammunition Plant in Gibson and Carroll counties, Tennessee. Twenty transects were established in August 1992 and were examined ca. every 3 weeks until March 1994. Percent frequency of browse by deer was different (P = 0.0001) among all seasons (n = 7). Browse percentages were...

Year
1995

Taxonomic Assessment of Coyotes and Domestic Dogs in the Southeastern United States

To assess the taxonomic status of coyotes (Canis tatrans) and domestic dogs (C. jamiliaris) in the southeastern United States, 380 skulls of unknown canids were compared to known skulls of these taxa. Twenty-four cranial characters were employed in a discriminant function analysis to separate statistically unknown canids as to coyote or dog. Hybridization between taxa was minimal. Our results indicate that the predominant wild canid occurring in the southeastern United States is coyote. The method of distinguishing coyotes from dogs based on a ratio of 2 skull features (length of the upper...

Year
1988

Home Range of the Coyote in western Tennessee

Home range of the coyote (Canis latrans) was studied in western Tennessee during 1985 to 1987. Using standard radio-telemetry techniques, annual and seasonal home ranges were determined. Annual home ranges averaged 31 km2 for males and 60 km2 for females. Home range size varied across seasons for both sexes. Females had larger ranges than males during all periods except the breeding season. Long-distance travel of 70 km and 55 km was recorded for 2 individuals.

Year
1988

Demography and Habitat Relationships of Raccoons in Western Tennessee

Winter densities, age structure, and sex ratios of 9 populations ofraccoons (Procyon lotor) in western Tennessee were compared to 16 habitat variables and between aquatic-associated and upland habitats for 3 pairs of sites. Densities ranged from 0.8 to 18.3 raccoons/km2 • Highest densities and proportions of juveniles and females occurred in bottomland deciduous forests; lowest estimates were in upland, pine-deciduous forests. The proportions of females and juveniles and the density estimates were correlated with habitat variables that reflected a bottomland-upland gradient, such as the...

Year
1988

Use of Scent-station Methodology to Assess Raccoon Abundance

Wildlife Outstanding Technical Paper

Monthly scent-station visitation rates, derived from 19 transects located in 4 habitat types (bottomland hardwood, bluff-shoreline, upland hardwood, and pinehardwood) in western Tennessee during May 1982 through November 1984 were evaluated as indices of raccoon (Procyon lotor) abundance. The correlation between scent-station indices and winter raccoon density estimates was assessed at 9 sites. Generally, scent-station visitation rates were high from May to October in all habitats, and moderate to low from November to April. Highest visitation occurred in June and July, and lowest in...

Year
1987

Food Habits of the Coyote in Tennessee

During 1981-1984, digestive tracts of 262 coyotes (Canis latrans) from Tennessee were examined for food items, and data were assessed in relation to sex, age, seasonal, annual, and spatial variation. Foods with highest percent occurrence were rodent, persimmon (Diospyros virginia), rabbit (Sylvilagus spp), and whitetailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). There were no differences between sexes and for foods eaten, and only persimmon varied significantly among age classes. Seasonal variation was found for rodent, insect, reptile and amphibian, opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and persimmon....

Year
1986

Taxonomic Status of the Coyote in Tennessee

To assess the taxonomic status of the coyote (Canis latrans) in Tennessee, the relationship of 61 Tennessee canids (unknown taxonomically) were compared to specimens of coyotes, dogs (C. familiaris), and red wolves (C. rufus). Twelve skull measurements were used in the assessment. Discriminant function analysis showed a well-defined separation of canid groups sampled. Tennessee canids clustered distinctly and were statistically separable from dog and red wolf groups. Hybridization between taxa was minimal. The wild coyote-like canids occurring in Tennessee are taxonomically coyotes.

Year
1983

Opossum Demography and Scent-Station Visitation in Western Tennessee

Removal trapping was used to study opossum (Didelphis virginiana) demography at an upland site in western Tennessee during March 1983. Monthly differences in scent-station visitation were assessed at 5 western Tennessee localities, representing upland and lowland habitats, from April 1982 to May 1983. A density of 1 opossum/ 15.6 ha was determined using removal trapping. Yearlings made up 64% of the 14 animals captured. Adult and pouch-young sex ratios were approximately 100:100. Mean litter size was 8.8 young. Monthly differences in scent-station visitation were found in lowland habitat (...

Year
1983