Craig A. Harper

Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA

Herbicides are Effective for Reducing Dense Native Warm-season Grass and Controlling a Common Invasive Species, Sericea Lespedeza

SEAFWA Journal Volume 3, March 2016

Practices within the Conservation Reserve Program promote planting native grasses and forbs to improve habitat for northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and other wildlife. However, native grasses often become dense and stands can be invaded by undesirable plant species that reduce habitat quality. We investigated three herbicides (clethodim, glyphosate, and imazapyr) at two rates to reduce native-grass density and five herbicides (aminopyralid, fluroxypyr+triclopyr, glyphosate, metsulfuron-methyl, and triclopyr) at two rates to control sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata), a common...

Year
2016

Current and Spatially Explicit Capture-recapture Analysis Methods for Infrared Triggered Camera Density Estimation of White-tailed Deer

SEAFWA Journal Volume 3, March 2016

Population monitoring of wildlife species requires techniques that produce estimates with low bias and adequate precision. Use of infraredtriggered camera (hereafter; camera) surveys for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; deer) population density estimation is popular among land managers. However, current camera surveys do not provide an estimate of precision critical for accurate density estimation. We believed that incorporating spatial aspects of sampling into the analytical process would allow for both estimates of precision associated with density and an ability to calculate...

Year
2016

Ruffed Grouse Reproductive Ecology and Nest Site Selection in Western North Carolina

SEAFWA Journal Volume 2, March 2015

Relatively low fecundity may be responsible for lower Ruffed Grouse (Bonasa umbellus) populations in the southern Appalachians compared to those in more northern areas of the species ' range. Nutritional stress imposed by poor-quality habitat and greater nest predation have been cited as negative influences on reproduction in the region. We monitored 56 female grouse during the reproductive season in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina, 1999 - 2004, to measure reproductive success and evaluate cover used for nesting. Nests (n = 44) were located to determine fate and habitat...

Year
2015

Northern Bobwhite Seasonal Habitat Selection on a Reclaimed Surface Coal Mine in Kentucky

SEAFWA Journal Volume 2, March 2015

Reclaimed surface mines present an opportunity to provide large tracts of habitat for northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus). Reclaimed surface mine sites are commonly planted to non-native species, including sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) and tall fescue (Schedonorus arundinaceus), which can inhibit growth of more desirable plant species and limit favorable structure for bobwhite. There have been no studies documenting how bobwhites use various vegetation types common to reclaimed surface mine land. Habitat use studies can provide information on selected vegetation types on these...

Year
2015

Influence of a Quality Deer Management Program on Hunter Knowledge, Perceptions and Satisfaction

SEAFWA Journal Volume 2, March 2015

It is well acknowledged that habitat management, herd management, and herd monitoring are necessary to best manage for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). A fourth component that must be considered is hunter participation. Hunter knowledge, perceptions, and satisfaction influence the success of a deer management program, as hunters play a key role in meeting harvest objectives. We surveyed hunters involved in a Quality Deer Management (QDM) program at Ames Plantation in western Tennessee from 2005 - 2013 to determine how experience in a QDM program influenced hunter knowledge,...

Year
2015

Effectiveness of Three Postemergence Herbicides in Controlling an Invasive Annual Grass, Microstegium vimineum

SEAFWA Journal Volume 2, March 2015

Effective control of Nepalese browntop (Microstegium vimineum) is important to land managers in the eastern United States because invasions can suppress native vegetation, thus decreasing vegetation diversity and habitat quality for many wildlife species. We evaluated the effectiveness of herbicides with varying selectivity (glyphosate, imazapic, and clethodim) at full rates and half rates (based on labeled rates for annual grass control) on the control of japangrass and their effects on non-target vegetation. We conducted our experiment in three forested areas in east Tennessee. We...

Year
2015

Structure of Avian Habitat Following Hay and Biofuels Production in Native Warm-season Grass Stands in the Mid-South

Wildlife Outstanding Technical Paper
SEAFWA Journal Volume 1, March 2014

Changing pasture and hayfield management practices have impacted grassland songbird and northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) populations in the Mid-South in the past 50 years. Non-native species, such as tall fescue (Schedonorus phoenix) and orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata), are commonly used for hay production, where they are managed in dense stands that are harvested during peak nesting periods for grassland birds. Native warm-season grasses, including switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) have been promoted for hay and biofuels production and are often touted as beneficial for wildlife....

Year
2014

Effects of Field Management Practices on Northern Bobwhite Habitat

SEAFWA Journal Volume 1, March 2014

Native grasses and forbs have been promoted in conservation programs to enhance habitat for northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus). However, high seeding rates and a lack of management result in vegetative structure that is less than optimal. We implemented six management practices (November disk, March disk, March burn, March mowing, strip-herbicide application, and September burn) with a control on an unmanaged field of planted native warm-season grass in East Tennessee, 2003 - 2004, to evaluate effects on habitat for northern bobwhite. We recorded vegetation composition, vegetation...

Year
2014

Preliminary Avian Habitat and Animal Performance Response to an Integrated Forage/Biofuels Management System in the Mid-south

Habitat loss, habitat degradation, and agricultural intensification are primary factors contributing to the decline of many birds that use grasslands, including the endangered grasshopper sparrow and the northern bobwhite. Current grazing practices in the Mid-South focus on getting high yields from dense, monotypic stands of non-native forages, which provide no bare ground, little vertical structure, and poor plant species richness. Few studies have examined the vegetative response of native warm-season forages to various grazing systems with respect to bird habitat, and none have been...

Year
2011

Post-harvest Fates of Agricultural Seeds in Tennessee Croplands

Agricultural seed left in harvested fields is an important source of energy for migrating and wintering waterfowl. However, rates of seed loss from germination, decomposition or depredation have not been quantified for corn, soybean, or grain sorghum. Because seed loss rates directly influence habitat quality and management recommendations for waterfowl and other wildlife, we estimated rates of germination, decomposition, and depredation for scattered seed and aggregate seed heads in 98 harvested corn, soybean and grain sorghum study plots across Tennessee from September - January 2006...

Year
2010