Ralph W. Dimmick

Response of Ruffed Grouse to Forest Management in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

Densities of male ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) were measured during 1976-1995 on 4 study sites in Tennessee, 2 in Kentucky, and 1 in Georgia using intensive counts of drumming males as the indicator of density to determine the impact of clearcutting in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The number of territorial males ranged from 0 to 4.0/100 ha over all study areas (1976-1995). Densities increased in response to clearcutting in Tennessee suggesting this forest management practice enhances habitat for the species. The number of breeding males on 1 area experiencing 12% clearcutting...

Year
1998

Distribution of Ruffed Grouse Southeast of the Range of Quaking Aspen

We delineated the distribution of ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) southeast of the range of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), and estimated the total range-area and forested range-area within this expanse. All or portions of 11 states comprised a total range-area of 285,184.3 km2, 25.7% of the total land-area ofthose states. The percentage of each state occupied by ruffed grouse varied from 99.4% in West Virginia to 2.5% in each of South Carolina and Alabama. Approximately 67% of the species' range was forested.

Year
1991

Survival And Habitat Use Of Northern Ruffed Grouse Introduced Into West Tennessee

Sixty ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) trapped in Michigan and Wisconsin were released in Benton County, Tennessee. Trapping, transporting and releasing were accomplished in late August and early September, 1976 and 1977. A total of 567 radio locations were made of 20 telemetered birds, 8 of which survived past their last radio location (I surviving beyond 14 months). Shrubby thickets of laurel (Kalmia latifolia) and farkleberry (Vaccinium arboreum) were heavily used for cover. By 2 mo. after release, 10 of 14 grouse dispersed more than I km from their release sites. Maximum dispersal was 4...

Year
1978

Distribution And Breeding Chronology Of Woodcock In Tennessee

Woodcock (Philohela minor) singing grounds were located in 39 counties in Tennessee. Harvest records indicated that the Great Valley and the Central Basin were the most productive hunting areas during 1966-1976. During 1977 and 1978 February hunting seasons, western Tennessee hunters, contributed about one-third of all woodcock. Spring migration through Tennessee occurred from mid February to mid March both years of the study. Testes of males shot during February averaged 9.2 mm in length both years (n =20, 1977, n =46, 1978). Follicle measurements offemales collected during February...

Year
1978

Evaluating Physiological Condition Of Bobwhite Quail

A total of 146 bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) was collected during the winters of 1972-73 and 1973-74, from 2 study areas in Tennessee and 1 area in Florida. Body weight, levels of body fat, burden of gastrointestinal helminths, and adrenal weights were determined. Quail from the Tennessee areas were significantly (P < 0.05) heavier than those from the Florida area. Fat was extracted using a Soxhlet ether extraction apparatus, and was expressed as a percentage of oven-dry body weight. Percentage body fat differed significantly (P < 0.05) among all areas, being greatest in east...

Year
1977

Populations and Reproductive Effort Among Bobwhites in Western Tennessee

Relationships between pre-breeding (March) and post-breeding (December) populations, and certain characteristics of reproductive effort are described for a population of bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) in western Tennessee. Numbers of quail on the 2100-acre study area ranged from 681 to 1269 in March, and from 1007 to 1587 in December during the period December. 1966 to March, 1974. A total of 1571 nests were studied to determine such items as hatching rate of nests with eggs (23.0%) and clutch size (x = 11.9 eggs). Of all variables examined, total number of nests found on the nesting area...

Year
1974

Zinc Phosphide And Prolin For Controlling Prairie Voles In Virginia Pine Plantations

Damage to forest plantations, fruit orchards, and nurseries by mice of the genus Microtus has caused serious economic losses, particularly in northern and eastern North America (Cayford and Haig 1961; Jokela and Lorenz 1959; Libby and Abrams 1966; Littlefield, Shoomaker, and Cook 1946; Sartz 1970). In southeastern United States damage to plantations of pines is increasing in importance. Two species of Microtus, the prairie vole (Microtus ochror;aster) and the pine vole (M. pinetorum), are widely distributed and capable of inflicting serious damage. This paper reports on the results of a...

Year
1972

The Influence Of Controlled Burning On Nesting Patterns Of Bobwhite In West Tennessee

Controlled burning has been widely used for managing plant succession in the southeastern United States. This technique has been particularly useful for retarding the encroachment of hardwood species in plantations of southern pines (Pinus sp.), and for maintaining herbaceous plant associations in early stages of succession. The results of controlled burning generally have been favorable for bobwhite populations, whether the burning was done for their benefit or for managing pine. More specifically, controlled burning in the deep South has increased the production of wild legumes, an...

Year
1971