J. Larry Landers

Fox Squirrel and Gray Squirrel Associations within Minimally Disturbed Longleaf Pine Forests

Fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) are an important species in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) forests. We estimated fox squirrel density within 6 minimally disturbed longleaf pine strands, examined association between fox and gray squirrels (S. carolinensis), and measured habitat variables at fox and gray squirrel capture sites. Fox squirrel density estimates ranged from 12-19 squirrels/km2 among study areas. Fox squirrel capture sites had higher pine basal area, higher total basal area, higher herbaceous groundcover, and lower woody groundcover than other sites. Gray squirrel capture sites...

Year
1999

Wild Turkey Brood Habitat Use in Fire-type Pine Forests

We studied habitat selection by radio-tagged eastern wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) hens with broods ≤30 days old in the fire-maintained pine (Pinus) forests of southwestern Georgia from 1988 to 1990. Habitat selectivity was determined for 14 hen-poult groups that were tracked for 1 week or more. Hens with young broods preferred (P ≤ 0.05) oldfields and woodlands grazed by cattle. Bonferonni confidence intervals for individual hen-poult groups with >20 locations revealed considerable variation among individuals. Individual brood hens showed preferences (P ≤ 0.05) for...

Year
1991

Trends In Wildlife Habitat Research

Wildlife habitat research in the Southeast has undergone several changes in direction since its beginning in the 1920's. Most recently, it has been marked by increased emphasis on special, seasonal habitat requirements; species other than major game animals; application of computer technology; babitat evaluation procedures; and methods of managing for wildlife diversity. These areas will continue to be emphasized in the 1980's. The broadening nature of habitat research and demands for quick answers to immediate problems will challenge the ability of the profession to maintain scientific...

Year
1980

Management Needs Of Sandhill Reptiles In Southern Georgia

Habitat use by the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus), eastern indigo snake (Drymarchon corais couperi), and associated species was studied in southern Georgia. Tortoises colonized sites where sand depth typically exceeded 1 m, and generally moved within areas less than 4 ha each year. The greatest population density (15.8/ha) was in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris)-scrub oak (Quercus spp.) stands burned every 2-4 years. Thirty other vertebrate species were observed using tortoise burrows, and den size was evidently a factor in selection by some. All radio-instrumented indigo snakes used...

Year
1980

Importance Of Habitat Diversity In Bobwhite Management

Seasonal usage by bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) of plant foods affected by prescribed fire management was investigated in southwestern Georgia and northern Florida. The early spring diet changed quickly from greenery to grass seeds (particularly Panicum spp.), while fruits from woody plants predominated in summer. The fall-winter diet was dependent on rainfall during flowering and fruiting periods of forbs and on periodic hard mast crops. An inverse relationship existed (P<0.05, r = -0.54) between consumption of legumes (Fabaceae) and oak mast (Quercus spp.); acorns apparently were...

Year
1979

Production And Utilization Of Waterfowl Foods In Brackish Impoundments In South Carolina

Waterfowl food production, availability, and use in brackish impoundments were studied in South Carolina. Widgeongrass (Ruppia maritima), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis parvula), and seeds of saltmarsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus) were sampled each month. Standing crop of widgeongrass vegetation declined from 241.11 kg/ ha in August to nearly none in December, due mainly to competition from filamentous algae (Cladophora spp.) Widgeongrass seed production was estimated at 6.16 kg/ ha. Although waterfowl fed intensively on widgeongrass seeds, no depletion was detected, and seeds apparently...

Year
1978