Toxicity Of Some Chemicals To Striped Bass (Roccus Saxatilis)

The toxicity of eight chemicals to one week old and one month old striped bass, Roccus saxatilis, was determined. These chemicals included malachite green, acriflavine, formaldehyde, Diquat, sodium chloride, zinc, copper, and sodium sulfate. In addition the toxicity of artificial sea water and oil field brine based on chloride content was determined for one month old striped bass. Tests were conducted in one gallon wide mouth jars containing two liters of water. Reconstituted water held at 70 degrees Farenheit was used as the diluent. A wide range in toxicity between the two age groups was recorded for acriflavine, Diquat, sodium chloride and sodium sulfate. The one month old fingerlings were slightly more tolerant to malachite green, formaldehyde and copper than the larvae. Zinc was the only chemical tested that required a higher concentration to kill the larvae. The combinations of salts found in artificial sea water and oil field brine based on chloride content were less toxic than equivalent amounts of chloride as constituted from sodium chloride.

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